Spring VHF and Up Sprints Start Monday Evening, April 11th

   I want to start out by saying that I’m having a hard time finding any “official” info about the Spring V/UHF Sprints.  Which means check back here, and I’ll post when I know more.  Traditionally, the spring sprints start in April and run (one band, one night per week) until May.  
   The only info I could find on Google was at this site:  http://www.qsl.net/n2sln/contestcalendar.html   If that info is true, then we have the 2m sprint on Monday, April 11th, 7-11pm your local time, followed by 222 on Tues, April 19th; 432 on Wed., April 27th; microwaves (900 MHz and higher) on Sat. *morning*, May 7th and finally the 50 MHz sprint on Sat. *evening* May 14th.  
    
    For those who have no idea what a Spring Sprint is, here goes:    They are one-band, one-night deals.   No major time commitment, no disruption to your weekend, and no “running the bands” like we do in the ARRL multi-band contests.    It’s a little more casual than a full-blown ARRL contest.   It’s a great opportunity for newer contesters to get some experience.  
    I hope we will have some rovers who go mobile and activate 2 or more grids.   If you want more info about roving, here’s two articles from my 9-part series called VHF Contesting School.   The specific articles about roving are http://kc9bqa.com/?p=1737 and http://kc9bqa.com/?p=1740   The first article is pretty general, and the 2nd article expands on roving strategies.   The general link to all 9 VHF Contesting School articles is http://kc9bqa.com/?p=2641   You are welcome to distribute any or all of those articles to whomever you care to.  The whole idea behind them is to get more hams comfortable with VHF/UHF Contesting.   I’m confident that if 100,000 hams read these articles, at least a few thousand would get on and call “CQ Contest”. 
   Here in the Midwest, the sprints get strong participation.    I know the 144 sprint last year was the most enjoyable one so far.    I had 32 contacts in 17 grids, on a night with average propagation.

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