This Week’s 144.240 and 144.252 Net Reports

6:45pm Thur.

IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR INFO ABOUT THIS WEEKEND’S VHF CONTEST, LOOK DOWN TO POSTS DATED SEPT 3rd and AUG 27th.   Everything you need is there.

On to this week’s net reports…

WB9LYH said the 144.240 net last night had tough conditions, with wind, noise and storms to the east.  Still, Mark had 9 check-ins:   N8WNA EN82;  KC9CLM EN52;  K9GY EN61;  KA9DVX EN51;  WA9BNZ, W9BBP and WB0WSQ EN40;  AC0RA EN41 and W0ANH EN47.
The 144.240 net is every Wed. at 8pm central/9pm eastern.  WB9LYH’s QTH is EN54cl, Central WI, near WI Rapids.  All licensed hams are welcome.   WB9LYH’s antenna pattern from Central WI is NE, then E, SE, S, SW, W, NW and N over the next 45-60 minutes.  He has 500 watts and stacked 17B2’s from a ridgetop location and loves pushing the propagation limits.  We love our local and semi-local check-ins, but WB9LYH is always ready to push the propagation limits with stations beyond that typical 200-400 mile range.  Please help us spread the word in a very wide area.
** WB9LYH says his schedule looks good for the rest of Sept. **   If something changes, I’ll post it here, but expect the net to be ON for Sept. 17th and 24th and Oct. 1st.
   EDIT, EDIT  4:30 Sept. 18th — Got word from WB9LYH that he will be unable to call the 144.240 net on Sept. 24th.  No net on Sept. 24th. 

K8TQK had 21 check-ins to his 144.252 net back on Monday night:  W8SOL EN71;  KC8RRT EN81;  KC8YJB AND KD8JQ EN91;  VA3HD FN14;  W2UAD FN13;  KB3TNZ FN11;  W3IP FM19;  WB4IXU EM86;  W4LES, W4IMD AND WA4NJP EM84;  N4TLL AND WZ8D EM87;  N8XA AND WB8ART EM79;  KI4ROF EM55;  W9SR EN70;  KB8GUE EM89;  W9CWG EN61 and W8IO EN73
The 144.252 net is every Mon. at 8:30pm central.  K8TQK’s QTH is EM89je, or far south-central OH.   K8TQK also has a very big signal and can easily work stations hundreds of miles away.  His antenna pattern is N, then NE, E, SE, S, SW, W and NW over the next 45-60 minutes.

There are MANY other fine nets and activity periods all 7 nights of the week, if one knows where and when to look.  Most are on the 144 MHz band (talking SSB, with horizontally polarized antennas), but there are also options for 50, 222 and 432 MHz.
To learn all about your options (with the emphasis on the Great Lakes, Plains and Ohio Valley) visit posts dated Oct 13th, 15th and 17th, 2013 at kc9bqa.com.  It’s all there.  If you notice something is missing or incorrect, please let me know via regular email  (my address is good at qrz.com).  I’ve had to disable the “comment” feature here because of excessive spam.

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