ARRL January VHF Contest is Jan. 21-22

9:45am Monday

The ARRL January VHF Contest is in 2 weekends.  It starts at 1900 UTC time (1pm central) on Sat., January 21st and runs 33 hours until 0359 UTC time on Monday (which is 9:59pm central Sunday night, January 22nd)    All bands from 50 MHz on up into the microwaves are in play.
Other big VHF contests are in June, July, August and September.

The link to the ARRL January VHF Rules page is here:  http://www.arrl.org/january-vhf
If you prefer short stories, you are done.  For those who like a little more details, read on…

Here’s a few paragraphs of promotional material from ARRL:  http://www.arrl.org/news/warm-up-with-the-january-vhf-contest-january-21-23

“The January VHF Contest offers Single-Operator and Multioperator categories. What’s really cool about this contest are the three Single-Operator categories, inviting to newcomers and seasoned VHFers alike: FM-only, 3-Band (50 MHz, 144 MHz, and 440 MHz), and Portable.

“We’ve seen some very strong numbers of participants and healthy scores recently in the FM-only category,” said ARRL Contest Branch Manager Bart Jahnke, W9JJ. “The number of Portable and Rover stations — and their accomplishments — has been amazing, even in the January event.”

Propagation can be a surprise in January, with winter E-skip, aurora, tropo, and temperature inversions. Jahnke said, “Even diehard meteor scatter and EME (moonbounce) folks will be trying some of the latest in digital processing software, including MSK441 (meteor scatter) and WSJT-X (EME), looking for newcomers as well as the seasoned crowd to get them in their logs.”

Getting on the VHF/UHF bands is not hard. Technician licensees have access to all amateur bands above 50 MHz. Antennas for VHF/UHF frequencies are available new or used, and you can even roll your own. Kent Britain, WA5VJB, offers useful information on his website on how to make your own “cheap Yagis.” Another approach is the Quagi antenna. Wayne Overbeck, N6NB, provides an overview on his website. For UHF+, loop Yagis are relatively simple to build, and designs are readily available. Even some HF antennas will work on 6 meters, and most modern transceivers offer 6-meter capability. A modest number of HF+50/144/432 MHz transceivers also are available, and transverters are available for all VHF and UHF bands.”

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